Tate Britain: Aftermath and Art in the Wake of World War One

Leave a comment

Tate Britain newest blockbuster exhibition, Aftermath and Art in the Wake of World War One looks at the impact of World War One on British, German and French art. The exhibition marks 100 years since the end of the First World War and focuses on how art was influenced by the tumultuous period in the aftermath of the war. The first and second rooms lookRead Now

The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever

Leave a comment

“Perry’s abiding interest in his audience informs his choice of universally human subjects. Working in a variety of traditional media such as ceramics, cast iron, bronze, printmaking and tapestry, Perry is best known for his ability to combine delicately crafted objects with scenes of contemporary life. His subject matter is drawn from his own childhood and life as a transvestite, as well as wider socialRead Now

Take a seat with Josef Frank

Leave a comment

“Explore the work of designer and artist Josef Frank (1885-1967) in the first-ever UK exhibition of his textiles. The Austrian-born architect moved to Sweden in 1933, where he developed his colourful brand of modernism, working with Estrid Ericson on furniture, glassware, lighting and interior design ideas. Together they redefined what is regarded as Swedish Modern. This exhibition in association with Millesgården, Stockholm highlights Frank’s vibrantRead Now

Guggenheim: Reviewing an Art Gallery with No Idea About Art

Leave a comment

Readers of this blog will know i know nothing about art, and luckily I’ve never set up a precedent of pretending to. So, this ‘review’ of the Guggenheim will, I guess, be a from a visitors perspective, not altered by any underlying biases of museum study. Basically, I loved it. Designed by American architect Frank Gehry, The Guggenheim is obviously stunning. The building is on three levels,Read Now

Fear and Love 

Leave a comment

“The exhibition asserts that design is deeply connected not just to commerce and culture but to urgent underlying issues – issues that inspire fear and love. This is a bold, multidisciplinary and global exhibition that aims to capture the mood of the present and establish the Design Museum as the home of design debate” I couldn’t read the description of the Design Museum’s newest temporaryRead Now

The Best, and Worst, Thing about Living in London

Leave a comment

It’s been circling around in my head for what seems like weeks, how to write about the opening of Tate Modern’s new building. Circling spiralling thoughts of how to write in a way that is concise, intellectual, factual. So much so, ironically, I’ve left it too late to discuss it as ‘new’ at all. Today I realised: it doesn’t matter. I realised this wearing myRead Now

Museum of Migration: Call Me By My Name

Leave a comment

Yesterday I went on a mad rush to get to the Call Me By My Name: Stories from Calais and Beyond exhibition before it closed. Working in West London and living in South, taking a trip to East London is never a simple quest. But it was so, so worth it. It was a first for me. Never before have I been moved to tearsRead Now

How to engage as a Millennial

Leave a comment

The title of this post is intentionally controversial, of course millennials can engage with a museum or gallery in a traditional manner. But I have become increasingly aware and interested in how the ‘millennial’ generation will develop to engage with museums. This was originally inspired by Marina Gross-Hoy from Imaginibus’ post about twitter, in which she tweeted a photo from the Metropolitan Museum of Art every half hour,Read Now

An Ode to Grandeur

Leave a comment

Museums are for the objects. Art galleries are for the artworks. I know that. But there really is something to be said for the grandeur of architecture. Disclaimer: I’ve never studied the significance of museum and gallery architecture, so I’m only speaking as an uneducated visitor. I visited Tate Britain as part of my 25 To Do’s pledge, to visit one museum or gallery aRead Now

Get Undressed

Leave a comment

Underwear. It seems pretty unimportant, worn under the clothes, purely personal fashion. How wrong I was. Undressed: A Brief History of Underwear, the new exhibition at the V&A highlights the cultural and societal contexts and impacts that our undergarments can have. Sponsored by Agent Provocateur and Rimmel, and displaying objects dated from 1750 to the present day, the narrative of the gallery is so muchRead Now