Geffrye Museum: Open House London

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This weekend I headed to Geffrye Museum to see what they were doing for Open House London. In part, this was a choice based on the (terrible) weather (Geffrye Museum is walking distance to my house). But, mostly, because I’m inpatient for Geffrye Museum being closed for two years for their refurbishment. On arrival, curators were asking visitor feedback and advice for how to make the reopeningRead Now

Museum of London: The importance of a comment card

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The London, Sugar & Slavery gallery opened in 2007, to mark the 200th anniversary of the end of the British trade in enslaved African people. London, Sugar & Slavery: 10 Years uses some of the thousands of visitor comment cards we’ve received over the past decade to reflect on the gallery and its contents. You can read a wide range of viewpoints, written by visitors from 6Read Now

Can Museums challenge Youtube?

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“Curated by members of the local LGBT+ community, this unique exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act, exploring and celebrating those who campaigned and continue to campaign for equality for LGBT+ people.  The exhibition details the development of an LGBT+ movement, showing the internal and external struggles, the different party political approaches to equality, and the social and historical context of the last sixtyRead Now

A Temple in London

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Ever since reading The Museum, a Temple or the Forum by Duncan F. Cameron, most museum visits for me have a background noise of thinking which they are, a forum or a temple. I visited the British Museum this week, for a lecture on the upcoming The American Dream exhibition. Opening on the 9th of March for three months, the exhibition will explore American culture,Read Now

Pinch Punch first of the year

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This highly intelligent and witty title is of course referring to this being my first blog post of 2017! It’s almost a year since living in London and I’ve still not been to all the Museums. (Not that I was ever expecting to, there’s about ninety???) I’ll be honest, I’m not the biggest fan of cartoons, excluding the Beano, of which I had a membershipRead Now

House of Terror

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Opened in 2002, the relatively new House of Terror in central Pest in Budapest is a memorial to the victims of horrific fascist and communist regimes in Hungary during the 20th Century. Guided by an English language Audio Guide, which I’ll add at this point was 100% necessary for a full understanding of the complex and difficult narrative, I visited the museum last week. It’sRead Now

When a Synagogue gets a hashtag

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Under the new Heritage Lottery Fund and Arts Council funding, the Manchester Jewish Museum is reinventing. Bollywood, comedy, theatre, Video Jame, gigs, and old classic Klezmah is revitalising the museum, opening up to a new demographic. The museum, and heritage site as a former 19th Century Synagogue, is looking towards the future. With long-term future goals of extensions and development, the museum is diversifying its audienceRead Now

Innovation Race

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Gender boundaries, interactives, war, Manchester, science, inventions. A lot to have in a gallery space no bigger than a standard sized bedroom. Yet, the Innovation Race at the Museum of Science and Industry somehow fits it all in, without overcrowding. Innovation Race is a temporary exhibition about inventions during the Second World War, specifically focusing on Manchester’s involvement and the Ferranti family. Set in darkRead Now

WHEN A HERITAGE SITE IS BOTH NOTHING AND EVERYTHING

As a recent visitor to the Victoria Baths, alongside the Cultural Concierge network, which I have been a member of representing the Manchester Jewish Museum, we had a private guided tour by a passionate member of staff. As a heritage site, the Baths are a beautiful, fascinating insight into the municipal bathing culture of the era. With this in mind, during this tour, I found myself questioningRead Now